Jun 23, 2024  
2023-2024 University Catalog 
    
2023-2024 University Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]


Music website

Music, School of



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School Director

Randall Goldberg

Assistant Directors

Kimo Furumoto
Bongshin Ko

School Office/Website

Clayes Performing Arts Center 220
657-278-3511
fullerton.edu/arts/music

Faculty

Ning An, Dustin Barr, Bill Cunliffe, Marc Dickey, Alison Edwards, Jean Ferrandis, Kimo Furumoto, Randall Goldberg, Robert Istad, Kerry Jennings, Bongshin Ko, John Koegel, Pamela Madsen, Sycil Mathai, Chris Peterson, Katherine Powers, Katherine Reed, Ernest Salem, Kenneth Walicki, Robert Watson, Gregory Whitmore, Rodolfo Zuniga

Introduction

The mission of the School of Music is to grow artistry, build community and advance distinction. The school achieves these three pillars of artistry, community and distinction by fostering an environment in which individual achievement and artistic expression thrive fully and equitably for our diverse students. Our degree programs and curriculum offer preparation for careers in music, music education or further graduate study. Our artist-teachers are professional musicians and academics who offer instruction in all aspects of music: theory, composition, musicianship, history, literature, performance and music education. The School of Music has been fully and continuously accredited by the National Association of Schools of Music since 1966.

Degree Descriptions

The Bachelor of Arts in Music offers three concentrations: history and theory, liberal arts, and music education (which has three subareas of emphases – choral, general and instrumental). The B.A. in Music is designed to produce graduates who: demonstrate knowledge of music history, literature and theory; are competent and reflective practitioners of music through performance/improvisation, composition and analysis; demonstrate professional standards of written and oral communication; practice successful collaboration in performance, both onstage and backstage; and apply global perspectives and current trends to their acquired knowledge and skills. 

The Bachelor of Music offers seven concentrations: accompanying, composition, instrumental, jazz-commercial, keyboard, piano pedagogy and voice. The B.M. is designed to produce graduates who: have basic knowledge of music history, literature and theory; are competent and reflective practitioners of music through performance/improvisation, composition and analysis; demonstrate professional standards of written and oral communication; are prepared for further study in graduate school; are intellectually curious to explore new avenues of expression; practice successful collaboration in performance, both onstage and backstage; understand fundamentals of the music business and how to develop their own entrepreneurship; and apply global perspectives and current trends to their acquired knowledge and skills.

The Master of Arts in Music offers two concentrations: musicology and piano pedagogy. A third concentration, music education, is scheduled to launch in 2023-24. The M.A. in Music is designed to produce graduates who: have advanced and proficient knowledge of music history, literature and theory; are advanced, reflective and independent practitioners of music through performance/improvisation, composition and analysis; are scholars who exercise professional standards of oral and written communication through research documents and oral presentations; demonstrate leadership through successful collaborative experiences, academically and in performance; and apply global perspectives and current trends to their acquired knowledge and skills in performance/improvisation, composition, education and career development. 

The Master of Music offers two concentrations: theory/composition and performance. The M.M. is designed to produce graduates who: have advanced and proficient knowledge of music history, literature, and theory; are advanced, reflective and independent practitioners of music through performance/improvisation, composition and analysis at a pre-professional level; demonstrate competence to enter their professional field with a high level of knowledge and skills; are scholars who exercise professional standards of oral and written communication through research documents and oral presentations; demonstrate leadership through successful collaborative experiences, academically and in performance; are intellectually curious in exploring new avenues of expression and creativity in programming; and apply global perspectives and current trends to their acquired knowledge and skills in performance/improvisation, composition, education and career development.

Student Learning Outcomes

Requirements for Undergraduate Music Majors

  1. Admission. Music majors are generally enrolled as pre-music majors at the time of admission. Upon successful completion of their entrance auditions, students are normally changed administratively to Music, Liberal Arts Concentration, B.A.  majors. Students may request a change to a different B.A. concentration or to the Bachelor of Music degree upon completion of at least one semester of coursework at the university, successful completion of a jury examination and recommendation of the faculty in the appropriate area of concentration. Transfer students who demonstrate exceptional skill may be permitted to enter the B.M. program at the beginning of their first semester.
  2. Audition. Upon entering the university as a pre-music major, or upon officially changing to a major in music, each student must present an audition in the appropriate principal performance area (instrument or voice) and a placement audition for class piano, unless the student’s principal instrument is piano or organ. Freshmen who fail to pass the entrance audition will have their majors changed administratively to “undeclared.” Transfer students who fail to pass the entrance audition must change their own majors.
  3. Proficiency exams: theory and piano. All students must pass proficiency examinations in traditional harmony (sight-singing, dictation, keyboard and paperwork) and piano before being approved for graduation. Transfer students take a diagnostic exam in theory and composition to assist in class placement. The piano proficiency requirement may be met by completing MUS 282B  with a “C” (2.0) or better. Students whose principal performance area is piano or organ may satisfy this requirement by completing MUS 285  with a “C” (2.0) or better. This requirement must be completed prior to a student’s promotion to 300 level.
  4. Principal performance area. Each music major must declare a single principal performance area (voice or instrument), which must be approved by the faculty of that area upon completion of the entrance audition. A successful audition is required for the student to receive state-funded applied-music instruction at the 100 (freshman) or higher level. Instruction must commence in the student’s first semester as a music major. New students must meet all university admission requirements and be fully matriculated into the university no later than one week before the beginning of classes to receive state-funded applied lessons. To be approved for graduation, each student must achieve at least the 300 level of proficiency in the principal performance area. Students in the Music, Liberal Arts Concentration, B.A.  who elect capstone project alternative 2 (MUS 497 ) need to reach only the 200 level.
  5. Applied lessons. All music majors are required to take individual, or “applied,” instruction in their respective principal performance area. Students in the B.A. program are eligible for a maximum of eight units of state-funded applied music (MUS 398  and MUS 497  included). B.M. students are eligible for a maximum of 14 units (MUS 398  and MUS 498  included). Students are limited to a maximum of three semesters of applied instruction per performance level (100-, 200-, 300-, or 400-level). Students must demonstrate satisfactory progress up to a capstone recital. Failure to demonstrate satisfactory progress results in denial of applied music lessons. Depending on the student’s principal instrument or voice, additional requirements may apply to individual instruction. See the area coordinator for each instrument or voice, or the School of Music office, for these additional requirements.
  6. Recital or project. Each music major is required to present one or more recitals or a project appropriate to the degree program before being approved for graduation. The project option is available only in the Liberal Arts and Music History and Theory options of the B.A. degree. Recitals at the 300 level of performance are designated MUS 398 ; recitals at the 400 level of performance are designated MUS 498 . See the sections on the Music, Liberal Arts Concentration, B.A.  and Music, Music History and Theory Concentration, B.A.  options for recital/project information applicable to those degrees.
  7. Major Performance Ensemble (MPE). The School of Music is performance-oriented with an audition requirement. All students are given equal opportunities to experience the highest level of ensemble music performance commensurate with their skills. To that end, undergraduate majors are required to participate in a major performance ensemble (MUS 406) and complete it with a “C” (2.0) or better each semester of residence. Additional MPE requirements apply to some instruments. Additionally, for a few instruments, other ensembles (e.g., MUS 407, MUS 408) may substitute for an MPE in advanced semesters. See the area coordinator for each instrument or voice, or the School of Music office, for these additional requirements and exceptions.
  8. Performance production. Undergraduate music majors are required to accumulate 60 hours of performance-related production activities: 30 hours during each of the first two semesters or 15 hours during each of the first four semesters of matriculation as a music major at CSUF. Production-related activities include recital and concert attendance, as well as learning about and participating in house and stage management, publicity and public relations, sound mixing and editing, lighting and streaming. Normally, students meet this requirement by taking MUS 278 two times as an elective. Students may also accumulate hours by volunteering to work on shows with the school’s production coordinator outside of class credit.
  9. GPA. To be approved for graduation, a music major must maintain a 2.5 GPA in all music coursework that is used to meet degree requirements. In addition, a student must earn a “C” (2.0) or better in all music courses required for the B.A. in Music or B.M. degrees.
  10. Good standing. To remain undergraduate music majors in good standing, students must take a minimum of 6 units of music each semester, to include applied lessons, major performance ensemble and a minimum of two units of academic music coursework.
  11. Exceptions. All requests for exceptions to departmental or curricular requirements must be directed by petition to the Director of the School of Music.

Programs and Courses Offered

Programs

    Bachelor of ArtsBachelor of MusicMaster of ArtsMaster of MusicNon-DegreeCertificate

    Courses

      Music

      Courses are designated as MUS in the class schedule.

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