Feb 20, 2020  
2017-2018 University Catalog 
    
2017-2018 University Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


Prefix and Course Index 

 

Finance

Courses are designated as FIN in the class schedule.

  
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    FIN 415 - Quantitative Theory of Interest (3)


    The theory of interest in both finite and continuous time; the use of various annuity functions as a basis for reserving, valuation, pricing, duration, asset/liability management, amortization schedules and measurement of fund performance; term structure of interest rates.

    Prerequisite: FIN 320 .

  
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    FIN 425 - Commercial Bank and Financial Institution Management (3)


    Financial institution problem solutions. Major financial intermediaries and the decision-making problems they face. Regulation and its effect on management operations. Group problems and case studies.

    Prerequisites: FIN 320  with a “D” (1.0) or better, not CBE pre-major or undecided/undeclared major; or MCBE graduate standing and not pre-MBA. Corequisite: FIN 321 .

  
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    FIN 432 - Financial Forecasting and Budgeting (3)


    Forecasting in financial management; profit planning and control process; goals, technical procedures and effects of budgeting; mechanics of forecasting and budgeting, follow-up and control.

    Prerequisites: FIN 320  with a “D” (1.0) or better, not CBE pre-major or undecided/undeclared major; or MCBE graduate standing and not pre-MBA. Corequisite: FIN 321 .

  
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    FIN 433 - Problems in Business Finance (3)


    Group problems and case studies relating to estimation of funds requirements, long-term financial planning, evaluation of cash flows, financing acquisitions and mergers, capital budgeting and cost of capital. Team-building, leadership and computer-assisted presentation skills. Not applicable for graduate degree credit.

    Prerequisite: FIN 321 .

    Course not available for Graduate Credit
  
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    FIN 435 - Capital Markets and Fixed Income Analysis (3)


    Fixed income markets, including the price dynamics and risk profiles of various fixed-income securities, derivatives, yields, duration, credit analysis of bonds, portfolio management strategies, calculating performance and identifying factors driving fixed-income returns.

    Prerequisites: FIN 320  or FIN 517 , not CBE pre-major or undecided/undeclared major; or MCBE graduate standing and not pre-MBA. Corequisites: FIN 340  or FIN 541 .

  
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    FIN 440 - Business Valuation, Mergers and Acquisitions (3)


    Valuation, especially for mergers and acquisitions. Valuation methods and their application in mergers and acquisitions. May not receive credit for both FIN 440 and FIN 540.

    Prerequisite: FIN 321  and not CBE pre-major or undecided/undeclared major; or FIN 517  and MCBE graduate standing and not pre-MBA.

  
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    FIN 442 - Advanced Investment Analysis (3)


    Securities markets and company analysis, security valuation models, the CAPM and the APT, option pricing and portfolio models. Practical application of investment theory and recent literature. May not receive credit for both FIN 442 and FIN 541.

    Prerequisites: FIN 340 , ISDS 361A .

  
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    FIN 443 - Advanced Investment Analysis II (3)


    Build and maintain portfolios of actual endowment funds using security and industry analyses in the Applied Security Analysis Program (ASAP). Second in two-semester sequence.

    Prerequisite: FIN 442 .

  
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    FIN 444 - Options and Futures (3)


    Put and call options, option pricing theory and models. Financial futures pricing, hedging strategies and models. Institutional characteristics of futures trading. Options and futures on stock indices. Options on futures, theoretical relationship between options and futures.

    Prerequisite: FIN 340  and not CBE pre-major or undecided/undeclared major; or MCBE graduate standing and not pre-MBA.

  
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    FIN 454 - Real Estate Market Analysis (3)


    Factors and influences of urban growth and development. Economic factors and real estate supply and demand. Location theory and urban growth patterns. Public policy as a factor in real estate development. Analysis of real estate markets.

    Prerequisite: FIN 351 .

  
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    FIN 461 - Business Property and Liability Risk Management (3)


    Duties and functions of a corporate risk manager, the major commercial property liability lines, including business income, general liability, commercial auto workers compensation, business owner insurance and operation of property liability insurers. One or more sections may be offered in any online format.

    Prerequisite: FIN 320  with a “D” (1.0) or better, not CBE pre-major or undecided/undeclared major; or graduate standing and not pre-MBA.

  
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    FIN 462 - Life and Health Insurance (3)


    Analyze various types of life annuity and health insurance contracts, major employee benefit plans adopted by corporations, and the organization and management of life and health insurance companies.

    Prerequisite: FIN 320  with a “D” (1.0) or better, not CBE pre-major or undecided/undeclared major; or graduate standing and not pre-MBA.

  
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    FIN 463 - Professional Ethics, Corporate Compliance and Regulation (3)


    How organizations can best assess and manage their exposure to legal, regulatory and ethical issues through corporate compliance programs. One or more sections may be offered in any online format.

    Prerequisites: FIN 320 , MGMT 246 , not CBE pre-major or undecided/undeclared major; or MCBE graduate standing and not pre-MBA.

  
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    FIN 464 - Insurance Marketing and Distribution Strategies (3)


    Prerequisites: FIN 320 or MKTG 351 with a D (1.0) or better, not CBE pre-major or undecided/undeclared major; or graduate standing and not pre-MBA. Practices and procedures involved in insurance marketing and distribution. Analyzes insurance marketing environment, marketing strategies and product promotion; introduction to insurance distribution channels and sales force management. (FIN 464 and MKTG 464 are the same course)

  
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    FIN 489 - Advanced Financial Analysis with Excel (3)


    Principles of finance (and related departmental disciplines) by blending theory and practice with the use of Excel in either projects or case studies in group and individual assignments.

    Prerequisite: Completion of one 400-level finance course.

    Course not available for Graduate Credit
  
  •  

    FIN 495 - Internship (3)


    A supervised experience where financial principles or methods are applied in a fieldwork setting. Mandatory class meetings for students to discuss their experience and integrate financial practice. Sections for other concentrations within the department will include application of relevant principles. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 units.

    Prerequisites: FIN 320  and 2.5 GPA; or graduate standing.

  
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    FIN 499 - Independent Study (1-3)


    Open to undergraduate students desiring to pursue directed independent inquiry. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 units. Not open to students on academic probation.

    Prerequisites:FIN 321 , FIN 340 , consent of department chair.

  
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    FIN 517 - Managerial Finance (3)


    Modern theory and practice of financial management. Net present value and the time value of money. Basic principles of risk and return. Capital budgeting and forecasting. Capital structure and dividend theory. Firm valuation from a value-based management and corporate governance perspective. One or more sections may be offered in any online format.

    Prerequisite: ACCT 510  and not pre-MBA.

  
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    FIN 523 - Seminar in Corporate Financial Management (3)


    Analyze financial decision-making process through case studies and seminar presentations. Current financial theory and models. International applications.

    Prerequisites: FIN 517  and not Pre-MBA.

  
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    FIN 525 - Corporate Governance (3)


    Fundamental concepts of corporate governance. Topics include the definition of corporation, roles and responsibilities of shareholders, directors and managers, and strategies to structure the interactions of these parties to help minimize agency costs.

    Prerequisite: FIN 517  and not Pre-MBA.

  
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    FIN 528 - Seminar in Financial Economics (3)


    Valuation or corporate liabilities and other securities. Economic decision-making under uncertainty and asset pricing theories are analyzed rigorously. Other topics may include optimal capital structure, the market for corporate control, or macroeconomics aspects of finance. (ECON 528 and FIN 528 are the same course.)

    Prerequisite: ECON 310 , ECON 320 ; or graduate standing and not pre-MBA major.

  
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    FIN 533 - Seminar in Financial Administration (3)


    Optimal financing and asset administration; advanced techniques of capital budgeting; application of analytical methods to the administration of the finance function of the business firm. One or more sections may be offered in any online format.

    Prerequisites: FIN 517 , classified MCBE status.

  
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    FIN 540 - Seminar in Business Valuation, Mergers and Acquisitions (3)


    Issues and techniques related to business valuation and mergers and acquisitions. May not receive credit for both FIN 440 and FIN 540.

    Prerequisites: FIN 517 .

  
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    FIN 541 - Seminar in Investment Management (3)


    Problems of investment and portfolio management; concepts of risk evaluation and investment criteria; analysis of interest rate movements; investment valuation and timing; regulation and administrative problems of the industry. May not receive credit for both FIN 442 and FIN 541.

    Prerequisites: FIN 517 , not pre-MBA.

  
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    FIN 542 - Seminar in Financial Engineering (3)


    Theoretical basis of certain financial models, including binomial tree models and risk-neutral valuation in discrete time, Brownian motion and risk-neutral valuation in continuous time, Black-Scholes option pricing models and various interest rate models.

    Prerequisite: FIN 444 .

  
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    FIN 543 - Entrepreneurial Finance (3)


    Financing a new/small firm, including forecasting the firm’s investment needs, raising short-term funding and banking relationships, managing working capital, making fixed asset investments and managing risk.

    Prerequisites: ACCT 510 , ACCT 511 , FIN 517 .

  
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    FIN 551 - Seminar in Real Estate Investment (3)


    Problems of real estate investment; concepts of evaluation and investment criteria; analysis of real property values; real estate development and financing. Case studies.

    Prerequisites: FIN 517 , not pre-MBA.

  
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    FIN 560 - Corporate Risk Management and Insurance Seminar (3)


    Managing risks that confront firms; how they are managed with diversification, capital structure, loss control, corporate governance, and how they are financed with commercial insurance contracts; analyzes market and instruments created to enable corporations to manage downside risks.

    Prerequisite: FIN 517 .

  
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    FIN 562 - Enterprise Risk Management (ERM) (3)


    ERM framework with the integration of pure, financial, strategic and operational risks. Discusses seven building blocks for developing an ERM program. Legal and regulatory environment, technical tools and future prediction on ERM.

    Prerequisite: FIN 517 .

  
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    FIN 570 - Seminar in International Financial Management (3)


    Financial problems of the multinational firm. International financing instruments, capital investment decisions and constraints on the profitability of multinational businesses.

    Prerequisites: FIN 517 , not Pre-MBA.

  
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    FIN 597 - Project (3)


    Directed independent inquiry. Not open to students on academic probation. May be repeated once for credit.

    Prerequisites: FIN 517 , classified MCBE status, consent of instructor, approval by Department Chair.

  
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    FIN 599 - Independent Graduate Research (1-3)


    May be repeated for a maximum of 6 units. Not open to students on academic probation.

    Prerequisites: FIN 517 , MCBE graduate status, not pre-MBA, consent of instructor, approval by department chair and associate dean.


Foreign Language Education

Courses are designated as FLED in the class schedule. Also see Single Subject Program in the College of Education.

  
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    FLED 307 - Classroom Technology for Teaching Languages Other Than English (3)


    Developing proficiency in the use of classroom technologies. Training in computer terminology, spreadsheets, word processing, publication, and presentation applications; Internet searches, information literacy, electronic communication issues. Meets state requirements for Single Subject Preliminary Credential.

    Prerequisite: EDSC 310 .


French

Courses are designated FREN in the class schedule.

  
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    FREN 101 - Fundamental French-A (5)


    Introduces essentials of the French language: fundamental vocabulary and grammatical structures. Conversational and reading/writing skills are equally stressed, and relevant cultural aspects are considered. Practice in the language laboratory required. Conducted in French.

  
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    FREN 102 - Fundamental French-B (5)


    Continuation of systematic introduction of fundamental vocabulary and grammatical structures. Maintains equal emphasis on speaking and reading/writing skills, along with considerations of French culture. Practice in the language laboratory is required. Conducted in French.

    Prerequisite: FREN 101  

  
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    FREN 203 - Intermediate French-A (3)


    Intensive practice in conversation and composition involving intermediate-level use of language and further exploration of French culture. Practice in the language laboratory is required. Conducted in French.

    Prerequisite: FREN 102 .

  
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    FREN 204 - Intermediate French-B (3)


    Intensive review of grammatical structures; develop mastery of conversational and compositional skills at the intermediate level. Practice in the language laboratory is required. Conducted in French.

    Prerequisite: FREN 203  

  
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    FREN 300 - Advanced Oral Expression and Phonetics (3)


    Developing oral control of the language through discussions, oral presentations, dialogues/ debate and further study of phonetics. Vocabulary development in areas of student concerns. Conducted in French.

    Prerequisite: FREN 204  

  
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    FREN 307 - Advanced Composition and Grammar (3)


    Helps achieve advanced levels of oral and written expression. Literary materials provide a basis for discussions, systematic study of complex modes of expression and thoughtful compositions. Conducted in French.

    Prerequisite: FREN 204  

  
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    FREN 308 - Advanced Composition and Grammar (3) (3)


    Helps achieve advanced levels of oral and written expression. Literary materials provide a basis for discussions, systematic study of complex modes of expression and thoughtful compositions. Conducted in French.

    Prerequisite: FREN 204 .

  
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    FREN 310 - French in the Professional World (3)


    Working knowledge of spoken and written professional language usage in the French-speaking world. Cultural and sociological contexts of professional interaction. Use of appropriate current periodicals and electronic resources. Conducted in French.

    Prerequisite: FREN 204 .

  
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    FREN 311 - French for International Business (3)


    Provides experience in reading comprehension and analyzing materials dealing with economic and political realities of international trade in the French-speaking world. Use of appropriate current periodicals and electronic resources. Conducted in French.

    Prerequisite: FREN 204 

  
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    FREN 315 - Origins of Modern France (3)


    Social, intellectual and artistic origins of French civilization. Conducted in French.

    Prerequisite: FREN 204  

  
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    FREN 325 - Contemporary French Civilization (3)


    Contemporary French culture organized along the lines of economics, geography, political life, social and artistic institutions. Current events are illustrated by recent documents (TV news, internet, videos, articles, films) and activities, including group presentations and debates. Conducted in French.

    Prerequisite: FREN 204  

  
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    FREN 375 - Explorations in Literature (3)


    Promotes deeper understanding and appreciation of French literary texts. Each genre (narrative, dramatic, poetic) introduces great writers. In-depth study of selected works initiates students to critical modes of reading and tools for literary analysis. Conducted in French.

    Prerequisite: FREN 204  

  
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    FREN 407 - French Film (3)


    Developing art of the French film, with special emphasis on the many roles of language. Montage, visual/verbal meaning, literary/cinematic narrative, non-realistic language, read language, non-narrative continuity. Conducted in English.

    Prerequisite: FREN 204  or equivalent and successful completion of 3 units of upper-division course work in French.

  
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    FREN 408 - Advanced Writing: French Syntax and Morphology (3)


    Mastery of forms and structure of the French language. Analysis and guided composition of various styles of discourse. Mood, sequence of tenses, voice, aspects and nuances of meaning. Conducted in French.

    Prerequisite: FREN 204  or equivalent and successful completion of 3 units of upper-division course work in French.

  
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    FREN 409 - Techniques of French-English Translation (3)


    Overview of theories of translation; examines several types and examples of translation (technical to literary). Actual translation from English to French and French to English.

    Prerequisite: FREN 307  

  
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    FREN 435T - Topics in French/Francophone Culture (3)


    Different texts (cinema, the media, internet, literature, art) centered around cultural topics (e.g., City and Country, The Outsider). Tools to understand French-speaking culture(s), from recent social issues to classic art and literature. Course may be repeated with different topics for a maximum of 9 units. Conducted in French.

    Prerequisites: FREN 204 ; 3 units of upper-division coursework in French.

  
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    FREN 466 - Introduction to French Linguistics (3)


    Analytical procedures of general linguistics applied to French. Structural contrasts between French and English. Applying linguistic analysis to teaching modern foreign languages. Conducted in French.

    Prerequisite: FREN 204  or equivalent and successful completion of 3 units of upper-division course work in French.

  
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    FREN 470 - French Literature & Power (3)


    Socio-political dimensions of French literature throughout its history. Expressions of alliance with, or resistance to, the established political order, from the medieval epic through 20th century literary texts. Conducted in French.

    Prerequisite: FREN 204  or equivalent and successful completion of 3 units of upper-division course work in French.

  
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    FREN 471 - Literature and the Human Psyche (3)


    Psychological explorations in French literature - from the Renaissance through the 20th century - through texts, which provide insights into the human psyche and shape our notion of the self at different moments of French cultural history. Conducted in French.

    Prerequisite: FREN 204  or equivalent and successful completion of 3 units of upper-division course work in French.

  
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    FREN 472 - Philosophical Exploration in Literature (3)


    Philosophical dimensions of French literature throughout its history. Interrogations about the human condition, and the role and place of human consciousness in the universe will be guiding theme in texts ranging from the Renaissance through the 20th century. Conducted in French.

    Prerequisite: FREN 204  or equivalent and successful completion of 3 units of upper-division course work in French.

  
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    FREN 475 - Seminar in 20th-Century French Literature (3)


    Transformation of genres in 20th century French literature (New Theatre, New Novel, New Criticism) leading to the re-examination of the institution of literature itself. Conducted in French.

    Prerequisite: FREN 204  or equivalent and successful completion of 3 units of upper-division course work in French.

  
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    FREN 485 - Senior Seminar in French Studies (3)


    Students analyze and synthesize, debate, and evaluate their own and other students’ individualized research projects on social, literary, linguistic, cultural, and/or philosophical issues related to the French-speaking world. Conducted in French.

    Prerequisites: FREN 204 ; 3 units of upper-division coursework.

  
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    FREN 499 - Independent Study (1-3)


    Supervised projects in French language, linguistics, culture, or literature. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 units.

    Prerequisite: consent of instructor and department chair.


First Year Experience Courses

  
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    UNIV 100 - Foundations for College Success and Lifelong Learning (1-3 units)


    Knowledge, skills and attitudes necessary for college success, and lifelong learning and development. Significant reading, writing and co-curricular learning opportunities. Designed for first-time college students in learning communities. One, two or three units in fall and/or spring semester. Three units maximum.

  
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    UNIV 115 - Optimizing the Student-Athlete Experience (1)


    Effectively locate and utilize institutional resources available to student-athletes, in an effort to aid in facilitation of academic, personal, career and athletic development. One or more sections may be offered in any online format.

    Prerequisite: Open to Student-athletes only.

  
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    UNIV 397 - The Peer Mentoring Experience (1-3)


    Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor. Knowledge and skills to be an effective peer mentor to first-year undergraduates. Mentoring experience through service learning in UNIV 100.

  
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    UNIV 499 - Independent Study (1-3)


    Independent research or applied project, under the direction of a faculty member. May be taken for credit for a maximum of nine units.

    Prerequisite: consent of instructor and approved learning plan.


General Engineering

Courses are designated as EGGN in the class schedule.

  
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    EGGN 100 - Introduction to Engineering (3)


    Introduction to engineering disciplines and their sub-fields, basic tools used in engineering practice, hands-on engineering projects.

  
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    EGGN 205 - Digital Computation (3)


    Computers and their numerical applications. Programming languages, MathCAD, spreadsheet, digital computation methods in statistics and solving algebraic equations. Applications of general purpose software for engineering analysis. (EGGN 205 and EGME 205 are the same course.)

    Prerequisite: MATH 150A.

  
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    EGGN 308 - Engineering Analysis (3)


    Fundamentals and engineering applications of Fourier transforms, Laplace transforms, complex analysis, vector analysis; engineering applications. (EGCE 308, EGEE 308, EGGN 308 and EGME 308 are the same course.)

    Prerequisites: PHYS 226, MATH 250B.

  
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    EGGN 314 - Engineering Economy (2)


    Develop, evaluate and present alternatives for engineering systems and projects using principles of engineering economy and cost benefit analysis. (EGGN 314 and EGME 314 are the same course.)

    Prerequisite: junior or senior standing in engineering.

  
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    EGGN 403 - Computer Methods in Numerical Analysis (3)


    Use of numerical methods and digital computers in the solution of algebraic, transcendental, simultaneous, ordinary and partial differential equations.

    Prerequisites: Math 250B and EGGN 205 or equivalent.

  
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    EGGN 495 - Professional Practice (1-3)


    Professional engineering work in industry or government. Written report required. May be taken for credit for a maximum of three units. Applicable towards bachelor’s degree programs. Not for credit in the graduate program.

    Prerequisite: junior or senior standing in engineering.

    Course not available for Graduate Credit
  
  •  

    EGGN 545 - Foundations of System Engineering (3)


    Introduction to challenges and considerations when designing complex systems. Fundamentals of systems engineering and system level modeling methods used in practice. Models and tools used to enable the use of models for trade studies during the design of complex systems.

  
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    EGGN 550 - Decision and Risk Analysis (3)


    This course aims at providing a well-rounded learning experience on risk management and decision making. This course will enable students to have an exposure to deal with engineering and business problems facing uncertainties.

  
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    EGGN 571 - Modern Product Design (3)


    Modern product development, design and prototyping are covered. Product development and prototyping is examined from a research standpoint in this course. Customer outcomes gathering, functional modeling, product architecture, modern techniques for concept generation and selection are explored. Also covered are recently developed theories and techniques for prototyping. The topics¿ place in the overall design process is shown through a product development and prototyping project.

    Prerequisites: EGME 214 , EGME 322L , EGME 335  and EGME 421 ; or graduate standing.

  
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    EGGN 572 - Decision Based Design (3)


    This course will focus on decision-based design as a generic tool for optimal decision-making, with an emphasis on applications in engineering design. It will also cover uncertainty quantification, and study the mathematical fundamentals of utility theory and discrete choice analysis.

    Prerequisite: EGME 454  or graduate standing

  
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    EGGN 597 - Project (3)


    Preparation for and completion of written and oral comprehensive case studies culminating experience requirement for the Master of Science in Engineering Management Degree. Supervising faculty advisor and Graduate Coordinator permissions are required.


Geography

Courses are designated as GEOG in the class schedule.

  
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    GEOG 100 - Global Geography (3)


    Introduction to world’s geographical regions. Cultural patterns and their evolution in diverse physical environments. One or more sections may be offered in any online format.

  
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    GEOG 110 - Intro to Natural Environment (3)


    Introduction to the major components of the physical environment, including landforms, climate, natural vegetation and soils. One or more sections may be offered in any online format.

    Prerequisite: completion of G.E. Categories B.4 and B.1 or B.2.

  
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    GEOG 120 - Global Environmental Problems (3)


    Geographical analysis of the Earth’s principal environmental problems. Population growth, agriculture and pesticides, climate change, forestry and fishing, energy, endangered species, and appropriate development. One or more sections may be offered in any online format.

    Prerequisite: Completion of G.E. Category B.1 or B.2.

  
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    GEOG 160 - Human Geography (3)


    Introduction to Human Geography. Understanding the regional distribution of language, religion, population, migration and settlement patterns, political organization, technology, methods of livelihood over the earth. One or more sections may be offered in any online format.

    Prerequisite: completion of G.E. Category D.1.

  
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    GEOG 180 - Digital Earth: Introduction to Geospatial Technologies (3)


    Introduction to geospatial technologies, including, Geographic Information Systems (GIS), Global Positioning Systems (GPS), remote sensing. Web mapping and location-based services.

    Prerequisite: 3 units minimum from G.E. Categories B.1-B.4.

  
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    GEOG 220 - Introduction to Gender and Social Space (3)


    Introduction to the study of gender within the history of geography as a social science. Concepts such as the social construction of gender and space and how these concepts vary in different geographical regions. (GEOG 220 and WGST 220  are the same course.)

  
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    GEOG 281 - Map Making with Geographic Information Systems (3)


    Principles and practice of effective map making using computerized geographic information systems technology. (2 hours lecture, 2 hours laboratory)

  
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    GEOG 283 - Introduction to Spatial Data (3)


    Introduction to the variety of evidence used in geographic analysis and the sources and techniques for acquiring geographic evidence.

  
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    GEOG 300A - Geographical Thought (3)


    Introduction to geographical thought through readings, discussion, and writing assignments. Environmental, regional and spatial traditions in geography, and current themes in geographical research. Meets the upper-division writing requirement for geography majors.

    Prerequisite: GEOG 100 GEOG 110 , GEOG 160 .

  
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    GEOG 300B - Geographic Methods (3)


    Quantitative and qualitative methods used in geographic research, including statistical techniques such as descriptive statistics, probability, sampling, inferential statistics, correlation and regression, and qualitative methods such as interviews and surveys.

    Prerequisites: GEOG 300A , junior standing.

  
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    GEOG 311 - Weather and Climate (3)


    Atmospheric elements and controls, fronts, severe weather and climatic classification systems.

    Prerequisite: GEOG 110 .

  
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    GEOG 312 - Geomorphology (3)


    Landforms and the processes responsible for their evolution.

    Prerequisite: GEOG 110 , GEOL 101 .

  
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    GEOG 313 - Natural Vegetation (3)


    Geography of the globe’s natural vegetation associations. Role of plate tectonics, climate, soils, fire and humans as agents of landscape-level vegetation change.

  
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    GEOG 321 - Nature and Society (3)


    Interface between human systems and natural systems. Various factors affecting human interaction with the earth, including environmental ethics, public policy and technology.

    Prerequisites: completion of G.E. Category D.1.

  
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    GEOG 328 - Global Change and Environmental Systems (3)


    Introduction to the Earth’s environment in the context of global change. Interdisciplinary discussion of the nature, causes and consequences of both the natural and human aspects of global environmental change. One or more sections may be offered in any online format.

    Prerequisites: completion of G.E. Categories B.4 and B.1 or B.2.

  
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    GEOG 329 - Cities and Nature (3)


    Impact of urbanization on landforms, climate, vegetation, and animals. Planning implications and case studies.

    Prerequisites: completion of G.E. Categories B.4 and B.1 or B.2.

  
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    GEOG 330 - California (3)


    Landscapes of California, their environmental characteristics, development patterns and current problems. One or more sections may be offered in any online format.

  
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    GEOG 332 - United States and Canada (3)


    United States and Canada. The interrelated physical and cultural features that give geographic personality to the regions.

    Prerequisite: completion of G.E. Category D.1.

  
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    GEOG 333 - Latin America (3)


    Mexico, Central America, the Caribbean and South America. The region’s physical and cultural landscapes. Emphasizes nature-society problems. One or more sections may be offered in any online format.

    Prerequisite: completion of G.E. Category D.1.

  
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    GEOG 336 - Europe (3)


    Basic physical and human lineaments of Europe. Elements that distinguish and give character to its major regional divisions.

  
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    GEOG 340 - Asia (3)


    Physical, human and regional geography of Asia from Pakistan and India through Southeast Asia and the Malay Archipelago to China, Japan and Korea. One or more sections may be offered in any online format.

    Prerequisite: completion of G.E. Category D.1.

  
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    GEOG 342 - The Middle East (3)


    Explores the geography of the Middle East from North Africa to Central Asia, with emphasis on the region’s physical, cultural, historical, economic, and political geography and contemporary issues facing the region.

    Prerequisite: completion of G.E. Category D.1.

  
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    GEOG 344 - Africa (3)


    Physical, human and regional geography of Africa. Saharan borderlands, East Africa and Southern Africa.

  
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    GEOG 345 - China (3)


    China’s spatial organization, emphasizing spatial pattern of population, migration, regional politics and economics, and China’s many types of physical and cultural environments. One or more sections may be offered in any online format.

    Prerequisite: completion of G.E. Category D.1.

  
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    GEOG 357 - Cultural Geography (3)


    The dynamic spatial aspects of culture, including cultural landscapes, cultural politics, and cultural practices to understand human relationships to place, to things, to the local and to the global - how geography helps people make meaning.

  
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    GEOG 360 - The Global Economy (3)


    Geographic perspectives on the global production of goods and services and their distribution to consumers. Key geographic issues in uneven development, international trade, investment patterns, and the spatial integration of local and regional economies.

  
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    GEOG 361 - Cities and Suburbs (3)


    American metropolitan systems and city-region linkages. Theories and spatial models of social and economic patterns within cities and suburbs; planning implications of these locational patterns.

  
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    GEOG 362 - Population Geography (3)


    Theories, models, concepts and facts in the field of population geography, growth and distribution, emphasizing birth, death and migration processes. One or more sections may be offered in any online format.

    Prerequisites: GEOG 160 , junior standing.

  
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    GEOG 371 - The National Parks (3)


    The geography of national parks and other protected areas. Origins and development of the national park idea. Preservation, recreation, and other goals of protected areas. Conflicts arising from the establishment of national parks in developing countries.

 

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